Top Ten Winter Weekend Activities for Adults and Children with Special Needs

Top Ten Winter Weekend Activities for Adults and Children with Special Needs

The weekend. This small phrase could evoke relaxing thoughts or overwhelming weariness. The upheaval of the normal schedule for two days can be tricky to navigate for families of special needs individuals, where routine often brings a sense of security and normalcy. To avoid utter boredom, frantic mayhem, or anything in between on the weekend, it’s helpful to find scheduled, supervised, engaging, and fun activities. So far, this all makes sense. But add in the factor of fluctuating (or just plain cold) wintertime weather, and the task to find fun activities can become just as overwhelming as not having any activities at all.

Don’t dread your weekends with your kids or adults who have special needs. We’ve compiled a list of ten winter weekend activity options recommended for special-needs individuals. Some activities require snow; some can be done on your back porch or in the living room.

 

Helpful Hints to Know Before Planning

First, a few suggestions to make winter weekend activities as helpful as possible:

  1. Have a calendar. Put it somewhere visible; make it as big and as fun and as normal as you can. Keeping your family’s daily norms (wake up, breakfast, lunch, bath time, nap time, etc.) the same through the weekend can help individuals with special needs realize that Saturday and Sunday are normal days too. Add in different activities in bright colors to create positive anticipation for fun events in the middle of a normal day.
  2. Schedule some quiet time. Remember that everyone needs the weekend to recharge before the next week. Make sure you allow for time for special needs individuals to have some independent play, imagination, rest, or time in an activity corner. You could put together a special weekend box of games and playthings that don’t require constant supervision, things like stuffed animals, puzzles, books, crafts, and favorite toys.
  3. Invest in a timer. Depending on the activities and events you choose to help your special needs individual participate in, it can be helpful for him or her to hear a clear sound that ends one activity and begins another. Positive endings to activities are just as key as positive activities.

 

Creative Fun to Have

Here are our top ten suggestions for fantastic winter weekend activities:

  1. Snow Play–If you live in an area with snow, then you might already be trying to get the “Do you wanna build a snowman?” song out of your head. Building a snowman, making snow angels, or going on a snowshoe hike can be fun ways to help your child or adult with special needs gain some sensory play in the winter. Make snowballs, but instead of a fight (which can be difficult for fearful or over-competitive individuals), aim to hit stationary objects and targets. Use the snow as your own family’s playground.
  2. Snow painting–For those who don’t like romping around in the snow, a great way to have fun outside and involve motor skills is snow painting. Gather squirt bottles (condiment bottles work well), fill them with water, add enough food coloring to make bright colors, and shake to mix. Children and adults both will enjoy “painting” their own artwork masterpieces by squirting the colors on the blank snow canvas.
  3. Indoor Snowman–Winter tends to revolve around snow, which can leave those of us in warmer climates feeling like we can’t find distinct winter activities. Indoor Snowmen to the rescue! (We suggest laying down an old sheet or newspaper or taking this indoor snowman to the back deck.) Gather a large box or plastic container; 2 boxes of cornstarch; 1 can of foam shaving cream; random buttons, sticks, leaves, clothespins, ribbons, or other materials from around the house. Dump the cornstarch into the box, add the shaving cream (you’ll use most of the can), and let your child mash it all together until it forms a crumbly mixture that you can shape into balls (add more shaving cream if it’s too dry to stick together). Make a snowman and decorate it with the random materials. You can re-use the “indoor snow” indefinitely if you use a box with a lid of some kind.
  4. Welcome to Fort Cozy!–With a little bit of forethought, you can put together a fort kit with old sheets, blankets, pillows, rope, cardboard, clothespins, and such. The sky is the limit with the imagination that goes into building forts. Plan to serve a snack, and make books, games, sensory bins, coloring materials, or perhaps an iPad readily available for hours of playtime fun in a cozy, soft blanket fort.
  5. Outdoor Recreation–Skiing, sledding, snowboarding, and other wintertime sports may seem inaccessible or impractical for some special-needs individuals. However, options have sprung up in recent years to allow for therapeutic recreation, which is defined as “creat[ing] adaptations so that people with disabilities have access to activities that they wouldn’t otherwise have” (www.parentmap.com). Check in your area to see if any organizations offer therapeutic or adaptive outdoor recreation options, especially if you live in snowy areas or near winter resorts. A few other suggestions: try to introduce your child to ski or snowboard areas on a weekday, when the slopes won’t be as crowded. It may help to prepare your child by reading a book about skiing or watching some videos on YouTube. If available, trying on ski or snowboard equipment ahead of time may make a first-time day at the slopes more enjoyable.
  6. Hockey–If able to ice skate, special needs individuals may enjoy and benefit from the community and team setting of ice hockey. If your child shows interest in hockey, playing some family street hockey with sticks and a ball in the driveway can give you an indication of your child’s abilities and attentiveness during play. Talk with local coaches and explain your child’s abilities and needs. Discuss any possible accommodations to make hockey a successful integrated experience for your child.
  7. S’more Fun–Build a winter bonfire in the backyard and roast s’mores. This can also be a great social interaction if you invite neighbors, hockey teammates, or other friends over to enjoy a relaxing afternoon or evening.
  8. Pool Time–Create your own sensory play time in an indoor pool! Take several pool noodles, cut them down to six-inch lengths, and fill the tub (or a plastic kiddie pool) with them. The bright colors and foam noodles will provide hours of sensory play, similar to a ball pit.
  9. Good clean…work–Wintertime chores can actually provide stimulating activity options for children and adults who have special needs. Shoveling sidewalks, scraping ice off windshields, collecting firewood, or making patterns in Jack Frost’s handiwork on windows while washing them off are all examples of chores that can become avenues for fun, physical development during the winter months.
  10. Obstacle Courses–Obstacle courses can be set up either indoors or outdoors, making them a versatile winter weekend activity. Outside, make tunnels in the snow, create paths to follow with visible markers, or set up a section of snow to shovel out of the way. Inside, connect rows of chairs for crawling under, ottomans to climb over, and “lava floors” (blankets on the floor that you can’t touch). Obstacles create opportunities to develop motor skills, translate sensory observations into resulting actions, and provide hours of learning fun.

 

Be The Best Sport offers great winter activities for children with special needs. Our Saturday sports enrichment programs are perfect to get out of the house and be active!

Please check out our program schedule, and register for a FREE Trial Class if you are interested in trying out any of our programs!

Winter/Spring Schedule 2017

DaySportTimeDatesDates OffAgesMax KidsPriceLocationRegister
SaturdayMulti-Sport9:30am-10:15am2/18 - 4/22NONE4 - 710$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayMulti-Sport10:15am-11:00am2/18 - 4/22NONE8 - 148$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdaySoccer10:15am-11:00am2/18 - 4/22NONE8 - 148$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayFitness/Kickboxing/Anti-Bullying11:15am-12:00pm2/18 - 4/22NONE12 - 2012$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayTrack & Field11:30am-12:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1510$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayKarate (Beginner) "Little Ninja"12:00pm-12:30pm2/18 - 4/22NONE4 - 78$160Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdaptive Karate12:30pm-1:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 128$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayTrack & Field12:30pm-1:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1510$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayBasketball1:45pm-2:30pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1512$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdaySpecial Needs Basketball2:30pm-3:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE10 & Up12$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SundayManhasset Soccer - Adaptive Program4:00pm-5:00pm4/2-6/18April 9,16
May 14, 28
June
Pre K - 6th Gr.40$50Click Here For InfoClick Here

 

Helping Special Needs Kids Learn Unfamiliar Things

Helping Special Needs Kids Learn Unfamiliar Things

Unfamiliar things come into everyone’s life on a daily basis. For most of us, these unfamiliar things do not cause too much confusion. However, for the special needs child, anything that is unfamiliar has the potential to become a huge challenge for them. Some will get frustrated trying. Some will look at it from every angle and try to figure it out. And some will just curl up and not even attempt to figure out what they need to do. There are several steps that you can take to help a special needs kid through the unfamiliar circumstances that they encounter.

1.     Start with the familiar.

In every situation, there is some kind of familiar factor. Start with that. Help them to see a color they know, a favorite shape, or a familiar person. They may need help becoming comfortable with the familiar in an unfamiliar setting, but it will become their rock. Be sure to point out the familiar in every unfamiliar situation to help them gain initial confidence!

 

2.     Look for the easiest adjustment.

When helping a special needs child learn unfamiliar things, it is important that you break down the situation and start with the simplest step or component. Starting with the simplest component will go a long way in helping them gain confidence and familiarity with the unfamiliar task or concept they are being asked to tackle.

 

3.     Watch for nonverbal and verbal clues.

It is so important to watch for clues when a special needs child is being asked to do something that is unfamiliar to them. As you are helping them, they are going to be constantly giving you indications that will let you see how they are adapting. Be sure to pay attention and adjust the situation as needed. If the child feels that their mode of communication is not being understood, they will get frustrated and will not be willing to move on and learn the unfamiliar that is trying to be taught.

 

4.     Be consistent.

Who doesn’t like consistency? This one factor is very important to a special needs child. As you are introducing them to an unfamiliar item or concept, be sure to be consistent with how you introduce it. Special needs children thrive on consistency, and if you try to introduce the unfamiliar in a totally different way from how you normally introduce changes, this will make the process so much harder for you and the child. Be consistent! It’s so important!

 

5.     Give praise.

Special needs children also thrive on praise. It gives them a reassurance that everything is okay, and it motivates them to move on and keep trying things. When they face an unfamiliar situation, they need that reassurance even more. It will take baby steps all along the way when it comes to introducing anything that is unfamiliar to them, but the praise that comes with every baby step will motivate them even more to achieve the ultimate goal!

 

At Be the Best Sport, our goal is to work in these ways to help your special needs child become comfortable with the unfamiliar things that they encounter in the sports arena. Each child will have their unique way of learning unfamiliar things, but with these steps, we are confident that we can help them learn each unfamiliar concept in a fun and effective way!

Winter/Spring Schedule 2017

DaySportTimeDatesDates OffAgesMax KidsPriceLocationRegister
SaturdayMulti-Sport9:30am-10:15am2/18 - 4/22NONE4 - 710$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayMulti-Sport10:15am-11:00am2/18 - 4/22NONE8 - 148$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdaySoccer10:15am-11:00am2/18 - 4/22NONE8 - 148$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayFitness/Kickboxing/Anti-Bullying11:15am-12:00pm2/18 - 4/22NONE12 - 2012$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayTrack & Field11:30am-12:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1510$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayKarate (Beginner) "Little Ninja"12:00pm-12:30pm2/18 - 4/22NONE4 - 78$160Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdaptive Karate12:30pm-1:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 128$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayTrack & Field12:30pm-1:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1510$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayBasketball1:45pm-2:30pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1512$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdaySpecial Needs Basketball2:30pm-3:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE10 & Up12$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SundayManhasset Soccer - Adaptive Program4:00pm-5:00pm4/2-6/18April 9,16
May 14, 28
June
Pre K - 6th Gr.40$50Click Here For InfoClick Here

 

 

Benefits of Track & Field For Children and Adults With Special Needs

The opportunity to participate in track and field events is one of the greatest ways to improve health physically and emotionally. Everyone can benefit from physical exercise, team effort, perseverance, companionship, and establishing and accomplishing goals; however, special needs individuals must work additionally hard at conquering obstacles and cultivating a spirit of friendly competition, both of which will carry over into other areas of life.

When choosing a track and field activity for your special needs child, consider his or her developmental age first, not physical age alone. Physical limitations or impairments in sight or hearing may require adaptive equipment or special modifications. Your child’s personality and potential responsiveness to a coach or teammates may determine the pace or number of participants that he or she is comfortable interacting with. Keep in mind your child’s interests by including him or her in the decision-making process. Lessen any uneasiness ahead of time by familiarizing your child with the rules and simplifying instructions in a way that won’t overwhelm them.

Many programs institute a buddy system. Older students are often paired with younger special needs children to participate together in the event of their choice–training together, competing together, encouraging each other. Special needs youth have the satisfaction of a one-on-one teammate with a sense of readiness and accomplishment that he or she would not have acquired without the support of their buddy. In addition, a partner makes transitions more comfortable and provides an example to follow.

Track and field can be modified to most disabilities, even though some special needs kids may require adaptive equipment or special conditions. For tossing events, like javelin or discus, a modified set of rules may apply for wheelchair participants. On the track, visually impaired participants may use a guide runner or parallel bars around the course to help lead. Strobe lighting or flags signal hearing impaired runners to start off. Races may be between athletes of varying disabilities. Programs like Unified Sports mix non-special needs individuals jumping over hurdles with wheelchair athletes racing alongside or around cones.

The benefits of track and field are many. Such activity

  • Sustains proper body weight
  • Promotes better coordination
  • Improves balance
  • Focuses attention
  • Teaches to drown out interruptions
  • Trains to work with basic coaching instructions
  • Focuses behavioral actions and boosts spirits
  • Works off unproductive energy
  • Provides adjustment to unexpected situations and new circumstances
  • Develops more regulated patterns of sleep
  • Adapts to multitasking
  • Gives clearer mind and mental focus
  • Teaches self-restraint
  • Provides teamwork in controlled amounts
  • Builds self-reliance
  • Accomplishes specific objectives
  • Motivates others

Be the Best Sport loves to see our athletes grow in all these areas! Our track and field program offers training in the following events: form and formula running, 200 meter run, 4×100 and other relays, long jump, obstacle course, hurdles, javelin, and shot put to name a few. Safety is a number one concern, so our track and field is individualized to accommodate each child’s special need. Our athletes will learn a variety of new events as well as have fun, make friends, and build confidence in the process.

 

Fall Schedule 2017

DaySportTimeDatesDates OffAgesMax KidsPriceLocationRegister
SaturdayMulti-Sport9:30am-10:15am9/9-11/11NONE4 - 715$250Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayMulti-Sport10:15am-11:00am9/9-11/11NONE8 - 1415$250Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayBasketball11:00am-11:45am10/7-12/611/257 - 1110$250YMCA at Glen Cove
125t Dosoris Lane
Glen Cove, NY 11542
SaturdayFitness/Kickboxing/Anti-Bullying11:15am-12:00pm9/9-11/11NONE12 - 2010$250Tokey Hill
95 Seaview Blvd
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayBeginner Track & Field11:30am-12:15pm9/9-11/11NONE7 - 15 10$250PW Tennis Academy
100 Harbor Road
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayFitness Fun11:45am-12:30pm10/7-12/611/257 - 1110$250YMCA at Glen Cove
125t Dosoris Lane
Glen Cove, NY 11542
SaturdayKarate (Beginner) "Little Ninja"12:00pm-12:30pm9/9-11/11NONE4 - 710$250Tokey Hill
95 Seaview Blvd
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdaptive Karate12:30pm-1:15pm9/9-11/11NONE7 - 1210$250Tokey Hill
95 Seaview Blvd
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayFitness Fun12:30pm-1:00pm10/7-12/611/2512 - 1812$250YMCA at Glen Cove
125t Dosoris Lane
Glen Cove, NY 11542
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdvanced Track & Field12:30pm-1:15pm9/9-11/11NONE7 - 1510$250PW Tennis Academy
100 Harbor Road
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayBeginner Basketball1:45pm-2:30pm9/9-11/11NONE7 - 1512$250Lutheran Church
12 Franklin Avenue
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdvanced Basketball2:30pm-3:15pm9/9-11/11NONE10 & Up12$250Lutheran Church
12 Franklin Avenue
Port Washington, NY 11050

 

How To Volunteer In Special Needs Sports Programs

 

Special needs kids often don’t play team (or even individual) sports at school, so they aren’t given the opportunity to get to know people of all abilities over the fun of playing a game. Volunteering to help in special needs sports involves understanding how to include those with differing levels of ability in ways society should but often doesn’t. A vivid example of this is the Special Olympics Unified Sports, which promotes teamwork by playing special needs and non-special needs individuals alongside each other in the same game. Such inclusion removes unjustified “preconceptions” of what it means to have special needs by a bonding love for sports.


Going Beyond

Some potential volunteers assume they might not have what it takes or the “forbearance” to work with special needs individuals. Those who move past these concerns find it well worth the effort. Working alongside those with special needs requires kindness, not merely forbearance. Wanting to aid another is a human emotion. Empathy, placing yourself in the other person’s situation, is necessary when interacting with special needs kids who may experience all kinds of behavioral, physical, or emotional disabilities—kids who often find it hard to fit in. The volunteer’s concern goes far beyond “how well would I interact with them?”

Life Lessons
Anyone can meet another’s need for friendship, understanding, and compassion. In working with special needs children, attitudes change and circumspection and empathetic responsiveness emerge. Volunteers gain the opportunity for self-growth and a unique insight into the obstacles those with special needs must overcome daily, which in turn grows an understanding of the lasting effects of disability. Sometimes working with special needs spurs the desire to seek a career in special needs education, and volunteering can boost that skill set and solidify commitment. Besides teaching tolerance, volunteering with special needs youth sports just plain ol’ gives such children a great time and a confidence boost through physical activity.

 

Where to Start

Seeking out local organizations is the best way to start. Volunteers can aid with things like build up and tear down for equipment and events, registration, support staff for participants, getting players and family or friends around the event campus, helping to find willing sponsors, advertising the events, or filling in with administration at the organization’s home office. Who volunteers? Anyone can volunteer but especially people wanting to perform community service like professional business teams, retired individuals, high school and college students, and service groups.

Be the Best Sport loves volunteers! We offer a year-round program that accepts ages 12 and up. It’s great for our special needs athletes because they are given opportunity for social growth, friendship, and teamwork. It’s great for our volunteers because they are shown an aspect of life they might otherwise never have been exposed to. Volunteering with us creates a sense of dependability and accountability. Like Unified Sports, we want to break down the barriers of misconceptions and prejudice and foster tolerance among everyone at all levels of ability. Athletes and volunteers come together, play together, and cheer each other on as we all work together on being the best sport.

 

Importance of Our Volunteers

At Be The Best Sport, we value our volunteers and they play a vital role in the success of our programs and mission to help the athletes gain new skills and increase their physical capabilities. Our athletes have smiles on their faces each week when their volunteer shows up to class and they look forward to spending time with them each week.

What Our Volunteers Gain By Helping

Volunteers will develop and build valuable skills for understanding and working with children with special needs in an athletic and recreational setting that will prepare them for future employment at either Be The Best Sport or another similar facility.  Volunteers will also develop a sense of who they are as part of their community and in the larger world around them. Many of our former volunteers have changed their majors in college or even career path and are now working with children with special needs because of the experience they had volunteering at our program(s).

Volunteer Training

New candidates applying to volunteer with Be The Best Sport will be required to attend at least one initial training session, three refresher sessions, and at least 10 hours of on the field community service. The initial training session will introduce all aspects of the program and what is expected of them as a volunteer so that they can help fulfill the mission.  Initial trainings will present an in-depth overview of the different types of physical and/or and mental disabilities that may be associated with a child with special needs and how they differ from each other. This will give new volunteers insight into the way children with special needs function and how each disability has its own set of unique characteristics.

Each hour-long refresher session will focus on scenarios of specific situations that can occur during program and appropriate solutions for addressing them.   This will provide our volunteers with an opportunity to ask questions and discuss any challenges encountered during class time as well as the necessary tools to effectively and appropriately problem solve if a difficult situation were to occur in future weeks. Although Be The Best Sport volunteers are required to attend three refresher sessions during the year, those wishing to eventually seek employment with Be The Best Sport as a Program Assistant, will be required to attend a minimum of four or more refresher sessions per year.

Once a volunteer is enrolled in the program, they will receive a t-shirt and binder with information detailing requirements and expectations of being a Be The Best Sport Certified Sport Coach Volunteer and the opportunity to fill out a questionnaire that will allow us to have a better idea of their strengths, weaknesses, areas of interests, and goals. Volunteers will also receive a certificate of completion that acknowledges completion of the required number of training sessions as well as required community service hours. Volunteers will also be required to complete a self-assessment that will be reviewed and discussed with our lead instructor. 

Current Opportunities

1. Sport Coach – Work 1-on-1 with one of our athletes at any of our various programs throughout the week.

2. Events – We host various events throughout the year and are always looking for help preparing for the days festivities.

3. Fundraising – Want to help us raise money for our cause? We have a variety of ways to get involved and help us raise funds to provide more opportunities and scholarships to our athletes.

 

If you would like to volunteer for one of our many opportunities, please fill out the form below and one of our team members will get back to you!

Volunteer Form

Determining the Best Sport Choice for a Special Needs Child

Determining the Best Sport Choice for a Special Needs Child


As part of the childhood rite of passage and growing up, each kid should have the chance to experience the fun of playing sports and the confidence and sense of belonging it can bring. Many sports can be adapted for special needs children and adults. For example, those in wheelchairs can play basketball or take up modified track and field, and those with limb loss or prosthetics can participate in therapeutic horseback riding or swimming. Perceived limitations should not prevent special needs kids with varying ability levels from trying.

Health Benefits

Sometimes concern of injury keeps parents or guardians from enrolling those with behavioral or physical disabilities into a sport, but it’s especially important for special needs children to get physical exercise to counter adverse health risks. Recent statistics show that the obesity rate for those with special needs is 40% higher than those without, and the odds of being bullied are three times greater than those without a disability. Sports can help in a variety of ways:

  • Cardiovascular improvement
  • Muscle coordination and skeletal strength
  • Weight control
  • Mental sharpening
  • Emotional/social skills
  • Reduced likelihood of other health complications

 

Personal Rewards

When choosing the best sport for your child, avoid mentioning any “limitations.” Help them go into the activity with a “can do” attitude. Schedule a doctor’s examination for any safety concerns, and inform the instructor or coach of any possible health problems beforehand. Understanding the special needs child’s abilities is key for parents. Those kids with behavioral, emotional, or mental disabilities might benefit more from one-on-one or individualized sports as opposed to team sports. If a team sport works best, notify the instructor and fellow players so that they become familiar with your child’s disability. Sports and physical activity in general can boost confidence for special needs children. It will be a stepping stone for trying new things.

Multiple Choices

Be the Best Sport offers a wide selection of sports that can be a benefit to children in many ways:

  • Basketball–teaches great teamwork and following directions, promotes hand-eye coordination, encourages camaraderie
  • Soccer–improves foot-eye coordination, teaches coaching instructions, coordinates play with peers
  • Multi-sport–provides a variety of activity and promotes physical coordination
  • Karate–teaches focus and control, great for individualized training and accomplishment
  • Fitness–promotes cardiovascular health and general muscle coordination with daily steady exercise routines
  • Track and field–enhances speed with individualized competition as well as team relay and obstacle course skills
  • Tennis–teaches hand-eye coordination and running, can be individualized or mixed doubles to promote limited exposure to teamwork

 

We want our athletes to learn to show respect to leaders and peers as well as to accept instruction. We desire that they make friends and learn good sportsmanship. Besides physical strength and growth, each of these sports has many ongoing benefits. Each child learns how to enjoy victory but also how to accept defeat. Team members learn how to congratulate other individuals on their wins. Special needs athletes learn to be compassionate toward those who have lost and to console others who are injured or disappointed. They can learn self-discipline and motivation skills they can apply in other areas of life. Be the Best Sport aspires to help those with special needs achieve these goals.

 

Summer Schedule 2017

DaySportTimeDatesDates OffAgesMax KidsPriceLocationRegister
MondayTrack & Field 5:30pm - 6:15pm July 10,17,24,31
Aug 7
NONE
8 - 158$150Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
MondayFitness 6:15pm-7:00pm July 10,17,24,31
Aug 7
NONE
8 & Up8$150Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
TuesdayMulti Sport 6:00pm - 7:30pmJuly 11,18,25
Aug 1,8
NONE
12 & Up12$200Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
Wednesday Multi-Sport5:30pm - 6:15pmJuly 5,12,19,26
Aug 2,9
NONE
5 - 88$180Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
WednesdayBike Riding6:15pm-7:00pm Session 1: July 5,12,19
Session 2: July 26, Aug 2,9
NONE
4 & Up3 Per Session $150 for 3 Weeks Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
Thursday Fitness 5:30pm - 6:15pm July 6,13,20,27
Aug 3,10
NONE4 - 88$180 Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
Thursday Bike Riding6:15pm-7:00pm Session 1: July 6,13,20
Session 2: July 27, Aug 3,10
NONE5 & Up3 Per Session$150 for 3 Weeks Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990

Why Track & Field Can Be Good For Autistic Children

As we all know staying active is extremely healthy for all children. It helps them maintain a healthy lifestyle and establishes a routine. For children with Autism is may be a little difficult to enroll them into team sports, especially if it involves constant social interaction and communication with teammates. However, there are many sports that are great for children that keep them active with less communication needed. One sport is Track and Field. 

Keeps Kids Social Without Constant Communication
Track and Field is not like other team sports where you have to communicate with your teammates to score a goal or get a touchdown. Track and Field is a sport that can be done with one person at a time. It is good for children with Autism that are not comfortable with constant communication with teammates because they still are part of a team without constantly communication with kids. It also allows kids to achieve personal goals at their own pace. Track and Field also helps build social skills because it keeps them engaged with children with similar interests with similar goals.

Keeps Kids Active
Track and Field is a great work out for the body as a whole. Running is great for raising good cholesterol, maintain healthy lung function, strengthens the heart and helps build muscles. It can also help with decrease chances of Diabetes and Obesity. For children with Autism it also helps improve coordination and muscle development.

Overall Track and Field helps with decreasing self-stimulatory behaviors, hyperactivity, aggression and destructiveness because it provides kids with the activities to release any built up energy. In addition, it also helps kids build self-confidence, achieve goals and makes them happy.

Here at Be The Best Sport we provide Track and Field programs that teach kids the basics of the different types of activities. For more information about our Track and Field program click here.