Special Needs Programs: Positive Impact on Parents

Special Needs Programs: Positive Impact on Parents

Many blog posts and articles focus on the impressive benefits of physical activity and developmental programs for children who have special needs. It’s helpful to read how these programs are resulting in growth, learning, physical development, and increased self-confidence. But in a family where special needs kids are present, everyone’s life is different and has challenging moments, not just the life of the one with special needs. Parents, in particular, can experience the gamut of emotions and struggles as they try to help their child enroll, participate, and succeed in special needs programs. But when children are plugged into the right programs, the result is a significant positive impact on the parents as well as the children.

Normalcy

A fact of life: people want to be accepted, to fit in, to belong. Another fact of life: loving and raising a child whose special needs may bring unwanted and sometimes judgmental attention makes feeling accepted and “normal” pretty difficult. As the parent tries to help the child feel normal, the parent ends up feeling less and less normal, and sometimes just helpless. Parents want to see their children grow and develop, to feel included. When kids are involved in programs geared to or with accommodations for special needs, the result is often development in balance, motor skills, hand-eye coordination, social interactions, positive self-image, confidence, muscle tone, teamwork, and the list goes on. Parents are no longer trying to help their children feel normal on their own; instead, there’s a team of coaches, physical therapists, teachers, mentors, and parents coming together to help your child develop. Kids’ involvement with a schedule and regular activities can also provide their parents with a sense of normalcy as mom loads up the van to head to soccer or dad leaves work early to cheer on the wheelchair basketball game.

Community

Even with a “normal” level of activity and involvement, apart from the right programs, it can be easy to feel alone in your struggle as a parent of a special-needs child. It’s far too easy to compare your parenting styles and level of involvement with other parents – parents who genuinely don’t have a clue what having a special-needs family member is like. As we’ve already seen, participating in the right special needs programs can help provide a sense of normal involvement in social activities. But a significant benefit to parents is a community where they – and their children – belong. Suddenly, there is a community of supportive parents who are in similar situations. They can sympathize when you talk about your child that struggles to get along with others, or struggles with academic ability, or has a hard time with hand-eye coordination. They understand what it’s like to feel easily judged, to just not know what their child needs at times. They can encourage you that you’re not a bad parent and that making parenting mistakes happens but it will all be okay. And as these moms and dads show you support and encouragement, remember that their kids are in the program right alongside your child and show them the same understanding, sympathy, encouragement, and support. Some of your closest friendships might form as a result of meeting other parents at a program each of your special-needs kids is involved in. Supportive parent groups are one of the most positive benefits of your child being enrolled in the right special-needs programs.

Personal Development

Many programs for special needs children will ask or allow parents to participate alongside their child. As you engage in physical activities with your child, you’ll likely see results in your own body: improved abilities, cardiovascular health, increased muscle tone, release of stress, and so on. Participation in programs geared towards skills and mental development can also help parents discover new hobbies, such as pottery, weaving, watercolor painting, or photography. Learning alongside your child provides encouragement for both of you as you’re in the boat together, and it can provide unique opportunities for better emotional connection.

Training

Different from personal development as a natural result of participating in programs, this positive impact on parents can affect every aspect of their interactions with a child who has special needs. Programs guided by trained therapists, mentors, coaches, and physicians provide a natural pathway for parents to gain detailed guidance and training about how to help their child succeed in multiple areas. These knowledgeable guides are often eager to communicate to parents the specific needs in which the child needs additional support or reinforcement and to train parents in how best to provide that support. Sometimes the conversations will be quick suggestions; sometimes you may need to request specific training times to help you learn how to develop specific skills to help your special-needs child. Perhaps enrolling your child in a special-needs program can allow you the time to meet regularly with a trained therapist or to take a class on your child’s specific needs.

Live, Laugh, Love

A rather cliché phrase, but think about it: as a parent of a child with special needs, you need to live, you need to laugh, and you need to love and be loved. A few cautions as you consider getting your kids involved (or upping your involvement) in special needs programs:

  • Remember that you are more than JUST the parent of a special-needs child. Is that part of your identity? Absolutely. But that’s not the only defining aspect of who you are. Like any adult who is also a parent, try to make time for things you’re interested in: friendships, activities, a girls’ night out, groups, exercise, hobbies, and even alone time. Decide to live, and your children will benefit: you’ll be more relaxed, and they’ll see what really living looks like.
  • Humor is key for any parent, and perhaps even more so when parenting a child who has special needs. Laugh at yourself. Laugh at humorous moments your children create. Don’t stress out trying to meet an impossible ideal. Mistakes and messes are ok, and laughter is good for the soul.

Hand out love like candy. Some days, that means you need all the candy for yourself – let others do kind and helpful things for you. You don’t have to be the super parent who can do it all herself! Most days, you can look for ways to share the candy. Schedule a skilled babysitter (maybe an understanding parent from your child’s special needs program) and go on a date with your spouse. Spend time reading to or playing with your children who don’t require as much physical or emotional assistance. Call a friend to meet for dessert or a cup of coffee when your spouse can handle things at home for an hour. As you pour love into others, they’ll reciprocate and you’ll get filled right back up with love.

 

At Be The Best Sport, our programs are designed to keep partipants safe and allow parents to be at ease and enjoy 45 mins – 1 hour to enjoy some time to speak with other parents and relax all while knowing their children are having fun and making new friends.

Share this post with others and have them register for a FREE TRIAL class at any of our programs!

Winter/Spring Schedule 2017

DaySportTimeDatesDates OffAgesMax KidsPriceLocationRegister
SaturdayMulti-Sport9:30am-10:15am2/18 - 4/22NONE4 - 710$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayMulti-Sport10:15am-11:00am2/18 - 4/22NONE8 - 148$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdaySoccer10:15am-11:00am2/18 - 4/22NONE8 - 148$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayFitness/Kickboxing/Anti-Bullying11:15am-12:00pm2/18 - 4/22NONE12 - 2012$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayTrack & Field11:30am-12:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1510$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayKarate (Beginner) "Little Ninja"12:00pm-12:30pm2/18 - 4/22NONE4 - 78$160Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdaptive Karate12:30pm-1:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 128$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayTrack & Field12:30pm-1:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1510$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayBasketball1:45pm-2:30pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1512$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdaySpecial Needs Basketball2:30pm-3:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE10 & Up12$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SundayManhasset Soccer - Adaptive Program4:00pm-5:00pm4/2-6/18April 9,16
May 14, 28
June
Pre K - 6th Gr.40$50Click Here For InfoClick Here

Benefits of Special Needs Basketball

Benefits of Special Needs Basketball

 

Drive through almost any neighborhood or even commercial areas with recreation facilities, and you’ll notice a common item: basketball hoops. Many kids grow up casually shooting hoops in the driveway or playing a pickup game with friends. Even kids who don’t know the rules of the game have probably played a variation of Knock-Out or H-O-R-S-E during P.E. or day camps. Special needs kids may feel unwanted and inadequate during these games, whether friendly or competitive in nature. Special needs basketball is a great way to give these kids a chance to try something new in a safe environment as well as receive guidance and instruction, develop social interactions, and gain confidence in their own abilities.

 

Try Something New

We’ve all been there: you’re out in public and someone calls your name: “Hey, Joe! Come over here and give this a whirl!” Whether it’s joining a game you’ve never played, tasting a new dish, or attempting a never-before-seen stunt on a bicycle, unfamiliar territory tends to make each of us uneasy. “What if we fail? What if we don’t like it? What if we break it? What if . . .?” So if trying something unfamiliar makes able-bodied adults and kids uncomfortable, how much more stressful is it for special needs kids? In a safe environment, basketball set-ups designed for special needs kids allow them to participate and have fun in a very common sport without the risk of public failure. A special needs program’s basketball court also provides a place for kids to realize that they are not alone. They will get to learn and develop these new skills together.

Personalized Instruction

Special needs kids have a wide variety of developmental needs, and basketball programs for these kids are usually designed with certified teachers and coaches who can work closely with each child to teach him or her the fundamental skills of the game. From basics like dribbling to more advanced skills like blocking and free-throws, special needs kids will be met at their level and aided in progressing through skills on the court. In some cases, special needs kids are paired with a peer or staff mentor who can demonstrate by example and provide even more individualized support. Rules of play are modified to fit national guidelines, such as the National Wheelchair Basketball Association’s set of rules, which provides needed accommodations and enables fair play while still teaching the fundamentals of the sport.

Social Development

Many special needs children are unable to take part in most schools’ team sports. An environment where these kids can actually join a team and learn how to be a team player provides a positive setting for verbal interactions, friendly play, and general social development. Basketball in particular sets up a fantastic opportunity for verbal and physical teamwork as every member of the team learns together to navigate their way down the court. Players learn how and when to indicate that they are open, to receive the ball, and to communicate with verbal calls or nonverbal signs to whom they intend to pass the ball. Kids will also learn to work together when not on the court, especially in areas such as encouraging their teammates, good sportsmanship, and respect for others: their own teammates, coaches, referees, and other teams’ players. Learning social and teamwork skills will benefit kids in a multiplicity of settings.

Boost Confidence

In any sport, a so-called “good player” will demonstrate knowledge of the game, coordination, depth perception, a sense of timing, and a sense of confidence in himself. That confidence actually results from having a grasp on these other “good player” abilities. Special needs individuals can greatly enhance self-esteem and confidence as they learn the rules of the sport and receive patient instruction that develops their coordination and senses. Basketball provides development in hand-eye coordination as well as both gross and fine motor skills. With basketball hoops so prevalent in our neighborhoods and recreation areas, an understanding of the basic rules of basketball paired with confidence in basketball skills can level the court and open the door for positive interactions with kids of all abilities.

 

Be the Best Sport recognizes that fun, guided play and one-on-one instruction can give each person the chance to succeed at basketball! With a creatively designed program that includes both on-court practice through drills and games as well as carefully supervised real-game play, our certified coaches work closely with kids to develop basketball skills, physical health and athletic ability, positive social interactions, and a personal sense of accomplishment.

Winter/Spring Schedule 2017

DaySportTimeDatesDates OffAgesMax KidsPriceLocationRegister
SaturdayMulti-Sport9:30am-10:15am2/18 - 4/22NONE4 - 710$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayMulti-Sport10:15am-11:00am2/18 - 4/22NONE8 - 148$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdaySoccer10:15am-11:00am2/18 - 4/22NONE8 - 148$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayFitness/Kickboxing/Anti-Bullying11:15am-12:00pm2/18 - 4/22NONE12 - 2012$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayTrack & Field11:30am-12:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1510$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayKarate (Beginner) "Little Ninja"12:00pm-12:30pm2/18 - 4/22NONE4 - 78$160Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdaptive Karate12:30pm-1:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 128$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayTrack & Field12:30pm-1:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1510$210Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdayBasketball1:45pm-2:30pm2/18 - 4/22NONE7 - 1512$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SaturdaySpecial Needs Basketball2:30pm-3:15pm2/18 - 4/22NONE10 & Up12$250Click Here For InfoCall 516.453.0990
SundayManhasset Soccer - Adaptive Program4:00pm-5:00pm4/2-6/18April 9,16
May 14, 28
June
Pre K - 6th Gr.40$50Click Here For InfoClick Here

 

Sources:

http://oureverydaylife.com/basketball-special-needs-kids-wheelchairs-17727.html

www.specialolympics.org

www.adaptedsports.org

www.online-basketball-drills.com

 

 

Benefits of Track & Field For Children and Adults With Special Needs

The opportunity to participate in track and field events is one of the greatest ways to improve health physically and emotionally. Everyone can benefit from physical exercise, team effort, perseverance, companionship, and establishing and accomplishing goals; however, special needs individuals must work additionally hard at conquering obstacles and cultivating a spirit of friendly competition, both of which will carry over into other areas of life.

When choosing a track and field activity for your special needs child, consider his or her developmental age first, not physical age alone. Physical limitations or impairments in sight or hearing may require adaptive equipment or special modifications. Your child’s personality and potential responsiveness to a coach or teammates may determine the pace or number of participants that he or she is comfortable interacting with. Keep in mind your child’s interests by including him or her in the decision-making process. Lessen any uneasiness ahead of time by familiarizing your child with the rules and simplifying instructions in a way that won’t overwhelm them.

Many programs institute a buddy system. Older students are often paired with younger special needs children to participate together in the event of their choice–training together, competing together, encouraging each other. Special needs youth have the satisfaction of a one-on-one teammate with a sense of readiness and accomplishment that he or she would not have acquired without the support of their buddy. In addition, a partner makes transitions more comfortable and provides an example to follow.

Track and field can be modified to most disabilities, even though some special needs kids may require adaptive equipment or special conditions. For tossing events, like javelin or discus, a modified set of rules may apply for wheelchair participants. On the track, visually impaired participants may use a guide runner or parallel bars around the course to help lead. Strobe lighting or flags signal hearing impaired runners to start off. Races may be between athletes of varying disabilities. Programs like Unified Sports mix non-special needs individuals jumping over hurdles with wheelchair athletes racing alongside or around cones.

The benefits of track and field are many. Such activity

  • Sustains proper body weight
  • Promotes better coordination
  • Improves balance
  • Focuses attention
  • Teaches to drown out interruptions
  • Trains to work with basic coaching instructions
  • Focuses behavioral actions and boosts spirits
  • Works off unproductive energy
  • Provides adjustment to unexpected situations and new circumstances
  • Develops more regulated patterns of sleep
  • Adapts to multitasking
  • Gives clearer mind and mental focus
  • Teaches self-restraint
  • Provides teamwork in controlled amounts
  • Builds self-reliance
  • Accomplishes specific objectives
  • Motivates others

Be the Best Sport loves to see our athletes grow in all these areas! Our track and field program offers training in the following events: form and formula running, 200 meter run, 4×100 and other relays, long jump, obstacle course, hurdles, javelin, and shot put to name a few. Safety is a number one concern, so our track and field is individualized to accommodate each child’s special need. Our athletes will learn a variety of new events as well as have fun, make friends, and build confidence in the process.

 

Fall Schedule 2017

DaySportTimeDatesDates OffAgesMax KidsPriceLocationRegister
SaturdayMulti-Sport9:30am-10:15am9/9-11/11NONE4 - 715$250Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayMulti-Sport10:15am-11:00am9/9-11/11NONE8 - 1415$250Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayBasketball11:00am-11:45am10/7-12/611/257 - 1110$250YMCA at Glen Cove
125t Dosoris Lane
Glen Cove, NY 11542
SaturdayFitness/Kickboxing/Anti-Bullying11:15am-12:00pm9/9-11/11NONE12 - 2010$250Tokey Hill
95 Seaview Blvd
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayBeginner Track & Field11:30am-12:15pm9/9-11/11NONE7 - 15 10$250PW Tennis Academy
100 Harbor Road
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayFitness Fun11:45am-12:30pm10/7-12/611/257 - 1110$250YMCA at Glen Cove
125t Dosoris Lane
Glen Cove, NY 11542
SaturdayKarate (Beginner) "Little Ninja"12:00pm-12:30pm9/9-11/11NONE4 - 710$250Tokey Hill
95 Seaview Blvd
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdaptive Karate12:30pm-1:15pm9/9-11/11NONE7 - 1210$250Tokey Hill
95 Seaview Blvd
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayFitness Fun12:30pm-1:00pm10/7-12/611/2512 - 1812$250YMCA at Glen Cove
125t Dosoris Lane
Glen Cove, NY 11542
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdvanced Track & Field12:30pm-1:15pm9/9-11/11NONE7 - 1510$250PW Tennis Academy
100 Harbor Road
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayBeginner Basketball1:45pm-2:30pm9/9-11/11NONE7 - 1512$250Lutheran Church
12 Franklin Avenue
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
SaturdayAdvanced Basketball2:30pm-3:15pm9/9-11/11NONE10 & Up12$250Lutheran Church
12 Franklin Avenue
Port Washington, NY 11050

 

Improving Special Needs Children’s Social Skills and Communication

Improving Special Needs Children’s Social Skills and Communication

Social and communication skills are vital for everyone to learn as they grow, but such skills can be especially challenging to master for children and adults with special needs. By giving them a helping hand, they will make relational connections with lessening difficulty and meet others with the same interests and opinions as themselves.

Teaching Social Communication

The ability to look people in the eye is key to making them feel they are being paid attention to and heard. If eye contact is difficult for the special needs child, turn it into a fun game; learning to hold a gaze even for a short time will be helpful in building social skills. Trouble with facial expressions and interpreting the emotions that come from them can present a challenge to knowing what other people are feeling. Special needs kids can learn to read facial expressions by playing guessing games to cue a particular emotion; for example, drawing or acting out facial expressions like sadness, happiness, anger, and fear gives them practice in recognizing emotions and responding appropriately.

Idioms can present a challenge as well because the words have no logical meaning and must be memorized. Teaching the special needs child such phrases and other popular slang helps them understand what is being communicated. Learning to keep conversations going on a given topic is also important in communicating with others. This can be accomplished by practicing basic scripted conversations to make special needs kids more familiar and comfortable in conversing smoothly. Storytelling, rehearsing and roleplay of various real-life situations (stores, restaurant, classrooms, etc.), telling jokes, or video-taping and replaying/reviewing practiced conversations all help in the transition to daily life.

Real-world Interaction

Making friends takes time and practice for everyone, especially those with special needs. With encouragement and reinforcement, special needs kids can conquer social skills by dividing up interactions into simpler, smaller “steps.” They will learn that asking questions and expressing curiosity shows interest in the other person’s opinions. They shouldn’t be pushed too far or too long all at once, but by adding minutes incrementally to each subsequent exposure to social situations, special needs kids can ease into and tolerate (or even enjoy!) spending time with others.

Buddy up with children of similar interests when visiting the special needs child’s favorite museum, park, or play place or when planning a fun day of shared activities at home. Set small goals when teaching them how to take turns and be kind to others. “Parallel play” is a suggested way for special needs kids to interact alongside other children. Set small goals for them to accomplish and build their confidence.

Serving the Long Island area, Be the Best Sport exists to help special needs kids of all ages and abilities learn to communicate and interact with others while having fun. We offer various recreational sports and physical activities to build mental and motor function as well as friendship with peers and staff members. We want our athletes to gain the confidence, physical strength, and social skills they’ll need to accomplish their goals in the future.

 

Summer Schedule 2017

DaySportTimeDatesDates OffAgesMax KidsPriceLocationRegister
MondayTrack & Field 5:30pm - 6:15pm July 10,17,24,31
Aug 7
NONE
8 - 158$150Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
MondayFitness 6:15pm-7:00pm July 10,17,24,31
Aug 7
NONE
8 & Up8$150Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
TuesdayMulti Sport 6:00pm - 7:30pmJuly 11,18,25
Aug 1,8
NONE
12 & Up12$200Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
Wednesday Multi-Sport5:30pm - 6:15pmJuly 5,12,19,26
Aug 2,9
NONE
5 - 88$180Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
WednesdayBike Riding6:15pm-7:00pm Session 1: July 5,12,19
Session 2: July 26, Aug 2,9
NONE
4 & Up3 Per Session $150 for 3 Weeks Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
Thursday Fitness 5:30pm - 6:15pm July 6,13,20,27
Aug 3,10
NONE4 - 88$180 Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990
Thursday Bike Riding6:15pm-7:00pm Session 1: July 6,13,20
Session 2: July 27, Aug 3,10
NONE5 & Up3 Per Session$150 for 3 Weeks Unlimited Sports Action
30 Beechwood Ave
Port Washington, NY 11050
Call 516.453.0990

Munsey Park Women’s Club Supports Be The Best Sport

Submitted by Munsey Park Women’s Club

Manhasset Press

November 18 – 24, 2015

 

Every year the Munsey Park Women’s Club (MPWC) reaches out to the community to search for philanthropic opportunities. They ask residents of Manhasset to apply for a grant that will help support a cause that benefits the residents of Munsey Park and/or Manhasset. The grants are then reviewed and one or two are chosen by the MPWC board. Valerie Siener, the cochair of philanthropic steering with the MPWC, leads the outreach effort and advocates for funding for small organizations. The MPWC strives to diversify giving and utilize local resources. One of the groups that the MPWC has chosen to support is a sports enrichment program for children with special needs. So many local children go to Unlimited Sports Action (USA) in Port Washington for all sorts of sporting lessons, clinics, and activities. Be The Best Sport is a nonprofit arm of USA. Be The Best Sport advocates, develops, creates, and builds specialized hands-on adaptive sports programs for children 18 and younger with developmental disabilities as well as physical impairments. There is a lack of such organizations in the area that are dedicated to providing support for youngsters with special needs.

Be The Best Sport accepts donations so that they can keep the cost down for participation in the classes, buy specialized mutli-sensory equipment and provide trained staff and coaches.

The Executive Director of Be The Best Sport, Michael Furino, explain, “We are so excited to receive generous funding from the Munsey Park Women’s Club for new equipment for our special needs sports program. It is because of organizations like the MPWC that allows Be The Best Sport to provide sports enrichment services to children and adults with special needs at a low cost. Funding like this enables our organization to grow and continue to offer special needs sports services to children and adults of all different ages and ability levels.”

“On behalf of the MPWC Philanthropic committee, we are happy and proud to support Be The Best Sport with a donation towards their continuing effort to offer opportunities for special needs children, so they may develop and strengthen their self-esteem, confidence, and sportsmanship. We also applaud Michael Furino for reaching out to this underserved population,” says Seiner.

The MPWC hopes to continue to assist groups like these and thanks the Manhasset community residents and MPWC members for support.

 

 

Benefits of Rowing For Children With Autism

We all know that Rowing is a great exercise for everyone and any age. Rowing is a sport that not only focuses on building your muscles but it also focuses on building team work and self confidence. Rowing also provides many benefits for children that are on the Autism spectrum. Here are some benefits;

1. Improving Muscle Tone

Rowing is an extensive work out. Many people believe that Rowing is just beneficial for improving upper arm strength but in fact it is a full body workout. When you row, your arms, back and shoulder muscles are engaged but with each pull you are also engaging your core, legs, hips and glutes. Children with Autism tend to not be as active which leads to their muscle tone be less than active children. By participating in Rowing children will be able to work out their muscles while having fun.

2. Losing Weight

As stated above Rowing is not only a great exercise to gain muscle tone but it also helps children lose weight and maintain a healthy weight. By incorporating Rowing into your child’s routine with a balanced diet you will see the benefits. Since Rowing is an extensive full body workout, it helps burn fat and develop muscles. Just a 30 minute workout can show tremendous improvements in weight loss.

3. Helps Improve Social Skills And Confidence 

Rowing is not only an individual sport but can be done in a team or class setting. Joining a Rowing class can help build social skills because children will help each other reach their goals. Children will also feel that they are a crucial part of a team. They will work together to build relationships and help each other reach personal and team goals all while having fun!

Photo: Port Rowing Adaptive Program

There are many great benefits that Rowing and exercise in general have for anyone. Rowing can provide a lot of great benefits for children with autism. The main focus is that everyone has fun!

Because Rowing is such a great work out for children we have implemented a Rowing Program for children ages 12 and up. For more information about the Port Rowing Program please click here.

Sources: Live Strong, Psychology Today